Review of PET’s ‘Breast Cancer, Business and Patents’: Ensuring your genes don’t affect your insurance

I tried to make insurance interesting on behalf of the Progress Educational Trust (PET) and the Wellcome Trust. Have a read.

The piece comes from PET’s recent event ‘Risk Management: Breast Cancer, Business and Patents’ — the third of their four-part project ‘Breast Cancer: Chances, Choices and Genetics’.

Simon Hazelwood-Smith reviewed the night for BioNews.

James Heather covered the second event — Risk Assessment: Breast Cancer, Prediction and Screening.

I covered the first one for BioNews and James wrote it up for the Wellcome Trust blog.

The final event — Breast Cancer Risk: Facts, Fictions and the Future — is taking place on Thursday 3rd July. See PET’s website for more details.

Fishing in the gene pool for Vikings: A review

We are sea-rovers, genetically. That is to say, you’re probably a Viking – but that’s not very exciting because so are most Europeans. If you’re from another part of the world and reading this, I imagine you aren’t so fussed about Viking heritage.

Vikings were fishers and merchants forced onto the open seas to escape their over-populated land in search of a livelihood. Vikings are romanticised and mythologised and made into TV shows and video games (both new and old). People pay good money to find out if they were born from Viking stock. Eddie Izzard subjected himself to a BBC programme about his genetic ancestry, discovering that he, like many others, descends partly from Vikings. So the essence of the question is not whether you are a Viking, but how much of a Viking you are.
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Shining Like a Ground Beetle — my review of Darwin’s nerdy birthday party

Week before last, I went to Darwin’s Birthday Party at the Natural History Museum in London. The next day, I scribbled about it for Pi Media. Read the review here: http://www.pimedia.org.uk/shining-like-a-ground-beetle

What follows is a version with hyperlinks:

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Commuters in London’s Waterloo Station during the 1960s may not have realised the shaggy man sitting alone on a bench, casting himself outside the bustle, was about to revolutionise evolutionary biology.
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